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Lech Lecha

  • Lech Lecha 2019

    What’s in a name?

    When we give someone a ‘Jewish’ name, we believe that it has great significance. It may be that the name is to celebrate or commemorate a family member – in Ashkenazi families, almost always a loved relative who has died; in Sefardi and Mizrachi families, it may be after a living matriarch or patriarch of the family.

    Or perhaps the name itself is of significance, such as ‘Simcha’ – joy; ‘Tova’ – good.

  • Lech Lecha 2018

    Bless You’ is something that we say to each other all the time - whenever someone sneezes. This custom is common to most countries around the world, and in other cultures translates as ‘God Bless You’ or ‘Praise be to God’.

  • Lech Lecha 2017

    You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes.
    You can steer yourself any direction you choose.
    You're on your own. And you know what you know.
    And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go...[to yourself]
    - Theodor (“dr.”) Seuss Geisel

  • Lech Lecha 2016

    Abraham is a pivotal figure in human history. He is the one who raises the banner of a monotheism which is now understood and followed by millions. He is also the father of goodness and kindness towards others as a way of life, a value system, and not merely as isolated acts of momentary compassion. And perhaps, most importantly, he alone emerges as the symbol of human resilience. He is able to overcome the ten tests of faith, and in addition to grow from the experience, and in this he is the true ancestor of the Jewish people.

  • Lech Lecha 2014

    Abraham is a pivotal figure in human history. He is the one who raises the banner of a monotheism which is now understood and followed by millions. He is also the father of goodness and kindness towards others as a way of life, a value system, and not merely as isolated acts of momentary compassion. And perhaps, most importantly, he alone emerges as the symbol of human resilience. He is able to not only overcome the ten tests of faith, but to grow from the experience, and in this he is the true ancestor of the Jewish people.

  • Lech Lecha 2013

    A close reading of the text in last week’s Parasha (Noah) reminds
    us that Abraham’s journey actually began with his father Terah (11,31). They leave Ur Kasdim together, but they settle in Haran and Terah never reaches the land of Canaan, their destination. In fact, only after Terah dies we read that G-d pushes Abraham to continue this journey; Abraham has already left his birthplace.

  • Lech Lecha 2012

    Midrash Bereishit Rabba 39:1 asks: To what can Abraham’s discovery of God be compared? To a person who went from place to place and saw a “bira doleket”, a castle in flames. He said, “Can this castle be without an owner?” The owner of the castle peeked out and said, “I am the owner of this castle.” So too did Abraham wonder, “Could this world be without an owner?” The Holy Blessed One peeked out and said, “I am the Master of the world.”

  • Lech Lecha 5773

    The title of today's Sidra is Lech Lecha which means go for yourself. This interesting expression occurs only once more in the entire Bible, in the story of the Binding of Isaac. This means that it symbolises Abram's unique mission to go and spread the knowledge of God everywhere. There are two explanations for the word Lecha in this expression. According to the Prince of Commentators, Rashi, it means: Go for your own benefit; namely, because from this journey you will derive contentment and a sense of achievement.

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